3. Silence is Golden

by klparry

Hello Friends!

There are writers I know who prefer to work while music plays in the background. In fact, I have heard an instructor suggest this to his class – and I cringed. I’ve always found it difficult – near to impossible to write outside of a quiet room. The distractions of a television or conversations, even music will send my fingers to the ‘off’ button on my computer as I find myself unable to concentrate on what my characters are doing.

This morning I read an article by Joy Lanzendorfer – 5 Writing Lessons Inspired by Famous Writers – found on WritersDigets.com. In Joy’s article she cites Emily Dickinson – composer of Transcendentalist? prose – marked as one of the most important American poets – leading a quiet, reclusive life in a serene setting, and Playwrite Eugene O’Neill – Nobel and Pulitzer Prize winner – who’s obsessive desire for a quiet place to work prompted him to cushion his study with three empty rooms to ensure absolute silence.

Now, I’m not comparing my works to theirs, but it is comforting to know that I am in the company of greats in my need for a quiet work space.

Do you require silence to write or are you one that enjoys some noise in your space?

If you’d like to read more from Joy Lanzendorfer you can follow the link I’ve provided below.

http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/5-writing-lessons-inspired-by-famous-writers?et_mid=665000&rid=239518498

Until tomorrow, Write on!

~ K.L. Parry

From the daguerreotype taken at Mount Holyoke, December 1846 or early 1847. The only authenticated portrait of Emily Dickinson later than childhood, the original is held by the Archives and Special Collections at Amherst College.

From the daguerreotype taken at Mount Holyoke, December 1846 or early 1847. The only authenticated portrait of Emily Dickinson later than childhood, the original is held by the Archives and Special Collections at Amherst College.

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